The Human Resources of Europe

Starting from the observation that before the crisis most of the EU member states showed increasingly efficient matching between unemployment and job vacancies, further analysis of present socio-economic data might seem as a contradiction in terms: currently, there are around 2 million job vacancies across the EU and in the meantime higher levels of unemployment are registered.

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HILL INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RESOURCE CONSULTING ROMANIA LIMITED SRL

ANCA RAICAN

ANCA RAICAN

BUSINESS UNIT MANAGER at HILL INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RESOURCE CONSULTING ROMANIA LIMITED SRL


ANDREEA POP

ANDREEA POP

SENIOR CONSULTANT at HILL INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RESOURCE CONSULTING ROMANIA LIMITED SRL


MONICA VRABIESCU

MONICA VRABIESCU

GENERAL MANAGER at HILL INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RESOURCE CONSULTING ROMANIA LIMITED SRL

Unemployment in Europe - social and economy impact, dangers, solutions Cross border mobility in Europe and what appealing labor markets still are in Europe's main regions ( Western, CEE, SEE)
Author: Monica Vrabiescu, Managing Director

 

 

In accordance with Eurostat News Release issued on February, 1st, 2013, the unemployment rose by 1.763 million in the EU27 and by 1.796 million in the Euro zone (EU17) during 2012, reaching an unemployment rate of 10.7% and respectively 11.7% in December 2012. In both zones, the unemployment rates have markedly raised compared with December 2011, when they were 10.0% and 10.7% respectively, while Romanian market has passed through a positive decrease from 7.5% to 6.5%.

 

As a common indication, the changes in the unemployment rate are linked to the economic situation, in general and the countries’ economic, social and political context, in particular. Although the unemployment is nowadays the main concern for many countries as one of the major consequences of the crisis period, we should also look from a global perspective to the workforce characteristics and its evolution for the next decades as shown by the Harvard Institute’s study about “Population Aging - Facts, Challenges, and Responses” which highlights the followings:

 

At the global level, the number of those over age 60 is projected by the UN Population Division to increase from just under 800 million today (representing 11% of world population) to just over 2 billion in 2050 (representing 22% of world population).” The fact that population aging is occurring and the need for replacement will increase in both developed and developing countries do raise new challenges and measures to be taken in adequately supplying and adapting the corresponding workforce on all levels: individual, organizational and societal.

 

Starting from the observation that before the crisis most of the EU member states showed increasingly efficient matching between unemployment and job vacancies, further analysis of present socio-economic data might seem as a contradiction in terms: currently, there are around 2 million job vacancies across the EU and in the meantime higher levels of unemployment are registered!


These findings leaded to an assessment of the main characteristics and challenges of the labour market within the EU member states initiated by the EU Commission and launched as part of the EU's overall strategy until 2020 to promote sustainable and adequate growth.

 

The outcomes of the assessment are underlining the mismatch between skills and labour market needs together with its main indicators, as follows:
• structural unemployment – as mismatch between labour demand and the skills and location of potential employees;
• skills mismatch – as skills deficit (gap) or skills underutilization (over-skilling);
• qualification mismatch – as under- or over-education (which could increase unemployment rate at highest level of education attained);
• job vacancies in relation with mobility rates;

 

The results of the assessment conclude that “there is urgent need to step up measures to improve labour market matching by adapting education and training systems to provide skills and competencies in future job-rich sectors -notably in the green economy, health care ,green and ICT sectors, by supporting occupational and geographical mobility through better cooperation between employers and employment services and by targeting young people through the development of partnership based approaches for apprenticeships and quality traineeships.”

 

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