KPMG ROMANIA SRL

 | 

CLAUDIA STAN

 | 

MADALINA RACOVITAN

  |  08.09.2015

Making the case for evidence-based HR – the bridge between your people and delivering business strategy

A new report from the Economist Intelligence Unit on behalf of KPMG International, shows key findings on how some of the world’s leading companies are using Big Data to spot connections between people management initiatives and business outcomes – highlighting that now is the time for C-level and HR leaders to embrace evidence-based HR and advanced analytics or risk losing ground.

Page 1/3
 1 2 3   
HR evidence-based
KPMG ROMANIA SRL

CLAUDIA STAN

CLAUDIA STAN

MANAGER, HUMAN CAPITAL at KPMG ROMANIA SRL


MADALINA RACOVITAN

MADALINA RACOVITAN

PARTNER, HEAD OF PEOPLE SERVICES at KPMG ROMANIA SRL

Evidence-based HR, simply put, refers to using data, analysis and research to understand the connection between people management practices and business outcomes such as profitability, customer satisfaction and quality.


However, while the growth of evidencebased HR is gaining momentum, our KPMG report conducted with the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) ‘Evidenced-based HR – The bridge between your people and delivering business strategy’ reveals this new era of evidence-based people management is by no means guaranteed.

 

Talent issues are firmly on the C-suite agenda – organizations across the globe are struggling with issues such as regulators, customer requirements, talent and the demands of the workforce. Now, more than at any other time in the past, HR has an opportunity to leverage technology and data in order to demonstrate its ability to deliver against these issues. For the first time ever you can draw a line of sight between HR activity and business insight.


And while our report backs this up and indicates there have been some gains in the perception of HR’s ability to deliver strategic value since KPMG’s 2012 report, ‘Rethinking HR in a Changing World’ (15– 23 per cent), it presents some interesting findings, namely that over half (55 percent) of executives are still skeptical about its potential to make a real difference. Yet, an overwhelming majority of these skeptical executives (82 percent) expect their organization to either begin or increase the use of Big Data and advanced analytics over the next three years.

 

Page 1/3
 1 2 3   

COMMENT ON THIS ARTICLE:




Load new captcha.